How To Make Pepper Using Scotch Bonnets

How To Make Pepper Using Scotch Bonnets

In this video, I explain the processes I go through when making hot pepper from the ghost & scorpion chilies I harvest. The process is relatively simple. First I cut the peppers in half, then I remove the pith and most of the seeds. Next I place them on my dehydrator and let them dehydrate. Lastly, I grind them up in my coffee grinder. Such beautiful colors and interesting shapes! All grown from a single seed!

I believe anyone can plant, raise, and harvest food from small spaces. We’re seeing shortages of basic items, with food being among them. I hope this video inspires and makes others realize that growing food in a suburban setting can be done. The backyard grocery store never has empty shelves! Happy Gardening!

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Some of my favorite gardening supplies are listed below:

Black Kow Compost –
Montery Garden Insect Concentrate –
Baker Creek Seeds –
Agrothive Organic Fertilizer –
EZ-Flo Fertilizing System –
Hoss Tools –
DmofWhi Coffee Grinder –
FEOOWV 25Pcs Empty Plastic Spice Bottles – http:/www.amazon.com/

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Chemical Free Gardening: Top Tips For An Organic Garden

More and more people are becoming interested in organic gardening as a safe alternative to store bought produce, which can contain all kinds of dangerous chemicals and may even present unforeseen threats with untested methods of genetic engineering. Additionally, most organic gardening techniques cost very little money. Keep reading for some useful tips on organic gardening.

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When designing your garden, choose high-yield crops, such as tomatoes and herbs. These items will allow you to maximize the space you have available in your garden. The more produce you can grow at home, the more money you can save in your grocery bill each month, so it pays to know what will produce the most for your efforts.

If you are planting vegetables, choose varieties that don’t require processing in order to keep. For example, sweet potatoes and onions will keep for months as long as they are kept cool and dry, without any additional work on your part. This reduces the amount of time you have to spend after harvesting.

To protect your crops from being ravaged by pests such as deer and other nuisance animals, be sure to fence your garden securely. A good fence will also keep other people from trampling your crops, or worse, stealing them. If you have burrowing pests like gophers, you may want to use raised beds for your vegetables.

Use mulch to add nutrients to your soil. Mulch is a much better way to amend your soil than fertilizers because it comes from natural ingredients in your garden. Commercial fertilizers may contain undesirable chemicals. In addition, mulch is free. All you need to do is compost your clippings and yard waste in a compost bin. Before long, you will have enough mulch for your entire garden.

Always read the product label before using garden chemicals and store the chemicals in a safe place out of the reach of children and pets. Garden chemicals like pesticides and fertilizers can be very toxic to humans, so make sure you are aware of any extra precautions you need to take when using, storing and disposing of the products.

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To make sure you don’t accidentally dig up bulbs in the following year, mark them with twigs. They should stay in place over the winter, and will be an easy reminder when you’re planting new things in the spring. This is especially nice because you don’t have to buy anything beforehand. Just grab some nearby twigs and put them in place.

If you are practicing organic gardening then try using baking soda to prevent powdery mildew from forming on your plants. Simply mix one tablespoon of baking soda with a half teaspoon of mild liquid soap and add to a gallon of water. During humid or damp weather spray your plants which are susceptible to powdery mildew with this mixture each week. The unused mixture cannot be stored and used later.

If you are new to gardening, start with plants that are natural to your area. Natural plants will be easier to grow. They will thrive in the natural soil of your area, and appreciate the weather conditions you are faced with too. Ask for information on native plants at your home and garden center.

For your flower beds, organic material should be used as mulch. Two or three inches should be enough. Mulch will minimize weed growth and maximize nutrients and moisture. Mulch also completes your garden, giving it a finished appearance.

Encourage toads to take up residence in your organic garden. Toads are a natural predator of many of the pesky bugs that will eat and destroy your crops. Create makeshift toad houses out of overturned broken clay pots and keep soil nice and moist to make it conducive to amphibian life.

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When you are thinking about starting an organic garden, figure out a plan. Creating a plan for where you want to place each plant will be time saving. If you have a short amount of time that can be spent in your garden, having a plan could help you make the most out of that time.

Applying the knowledge you learned here to your garden will help ensure you have a thriving, toxin-free garden of your very own. When your garden works with nature, you will also be able to notice an increase in the number of wildlife inhabiting your garden.

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Cammie Simmons

About the Author: Cammie Simmons

Cammie Simmons encourages others to embrace the joys of gardening. She firmly believes that nurturing plants not only enhances the physical environment but also promotes mental and emotional well-being.