Harvesting Ginger Grown From Store Bought Ginger

Harvesting Ginger Grown From Store Bought Ginger

In this video, I harvest ginger I started from a piece of store brought ginger. The ginger was started about four months ago. We’re seeing shortages of basic items, with food being among them. I hope this video inspires and makes others realize that growing food in a suburban setting can be done. The backyard grocery store never has empty shelves! Happy Gardening!

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Visit My Amazon Storefront for products I use most often in my garden. The link is below:

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The Rusted Garden –
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Affliates & Links

AgroThrive Fertilizer –

Olle Garden Raised Beds –
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BootStrap Farmer –https://shareasale.com/r.cfmb=1020530&u=3490985&m=72437&urllink=&afftrack=

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Some of my favorite gardening supplies are listed below:

GMISUN Mini Hot Sauce Bottles –
Xantham Gum –
Montery Garden Insect Concentrate –
Baker Creek Seeds –
EZ-Flo Fertilizing System –
Hoss Tools –

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Equipment and Software Used

MacPro – Apple
Apple – Iphone 13 Max
Garage Band – Music Creator
Video Equipment – GoPro 10
Video Software – KineMaster 6

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Everything You Should Know About Organic Gardening

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Ready to start growing your own food via an organic garden? Do you know how to tart growing a garden like that? If not, no worries, this article has your back. Below are some tips and tricks that can get you started with the basics of growing an organic garden.

Gardening can be a very rewarding practice. Not only can you improve the look of the outside of your home, but you can be proud of it as well. There are plenty of tools and things to use in gardening and this can be a very rewarding activity. You can improve not only your home but your neighborhood and quite possibly start saving on groceries by growing your own food!

After planting your garden, maintaining it is still a work in progress. Throughout the summer season, it is a must for a gardener to continue to prune, pick or deadhead blooms. Gardening can be physically exhausting with hauling dirt and digging holes, but at the end of the day, your hard work is paid off by seeing the beauty that you have created.

Plant vegetables and flowers that are native to your local area. These plants will grow better with less work than plants that are not native. Also, native plants won’t require much extra watering, as they will generally adapt to the amount of rain typical to that area. This will also reduce your need for pesticides and fertilizers, since the plants will be able to handle the soil and pests in your area.

When uprooting a perennial plant, you should start digging at its drip line. Dig a trench around the plant, and cut any roots that extend beyond that trench. You can tie stems together to avoid damaging the plant during the process. Once all the roots are severed lift the plant carefully by its main stem.

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If you want something fun to do that will benefit you in the kitchen, try growing some herbs in your window. Some herbs may not take kindly to this, but many will! In this way you have some herbs always fresh and handy, and they add a nice touch to the house.

Don’t buy plant pots. Commercial plant plots from the garden center can be very expensive, anything from $5 to $100. Any container with a few draining holes pierced into the bottom of it can serve as a plant pot, so to save a lot of money, start recycling food containers today.

An old wagon can help save time as well as your back. Instead of constantly having to retrieve your gardening tools as you work your way around your garden, commandeer an old child’s wagon. An old wagon works as well as a garden cart, and can often be obtained free or very cheaply if you get it used.

When you are pruning a tree, make sure that your tools are sharp. Cutting with a dull tool can tear the bark off the tree, causing unnecessary damage to the tree. Not only that, cutting with a dull tool causes you to spend extra energy in cutting. A sharp tool will give you a cleaner cut with the least amount of effort.

Pay attention when watering your roses. Until their roots are established roses should be well watered, afterwards they will only need watering during dry spells. Water from a can, not a hose, pouring closely to the ground. Splashing the leaves with water can lead to mildew if there isn’t enough sun to dry them off before nightfall.

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A wonderful treat for your indoor houseplants is to take them outside periodically and let them bask in the glory of a summer rainstorm. You will be treating them to higher humidity and longer hours of daylight that far surpasses the stale conditions they may be getting indoors! You will want to minimize too much direct sunlight and make sure your plant containers have good drainage holes so that extra rainwater doesn’t collect to cause root rot. Some quality time in the outdoors will pay off with lush, healthy plants year-round!

With the previous tips kept in mind, you ought to be ready to start growing your own organic food. It does take some research, hard work outside, and some patience, but if you keep at it, it is indeed possible to have a successful organic garden. So, get out there and grow!

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Cammie Simmons

About the Author: Cammie Simmons

Cammie Simmons encourages others to embrace the joys of gardening. She firmly believes that nurturing plants not only enhances the physical environment but also promotes mental and emotional well-being.