7 Ways to USE Weeds In Your Garden

7 Ways to USE Weeds In Your Garden

The definition of a weed is “A plant that is not valued where it is growing”, so here are 7 ways you can learn to VALUE those plants and turn them into useful helpers in your edible and ornamental gardens.

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Top Tips For A Garden Scheme That Will Take Your Breath Away

Growing an organic garden might appear very complicated and involved, but if you know what you are doing, it can be a very exciting experience. If you don’t know what you are doing, you can waste a lot of money and watch alot of your plants die. The tips listed below can help you avoid this.

When removing and replanting perennials, it is important to replenish the soil as well. If you remove a large number of perennials, and then replant them without adding additional compost and soil, the bed will be lower, reducing drainage and air circulation. Also, the compost will replace nutrients that have been used up by previous growing seasons.

A good idea when gardening is to keep a record of progress. If it is a journal form or photographic form of recording the progress of the garden is helpful for the years to come. Recording which types of plants work well, which did not work or what types of soil can help future gardens start without any trial and error of previous years.

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Grow from seeds. In garden centers, it is usually much cheaper to purchase a packet of seeds than to buy the equivalent number of grown plants. Remember, if you sow some seeds before the summer, you can get a garden full of bright, colorful flowers for a very cheap price.

Weed the garden often and early. Plan on a weeding schedule for the garden at least three times. The first should be five to seven days after sowing, and again seven to ten days after that. The third time should be three to four weeks after planting, by this time the plants should be rooted well enough to add mulching and sufficient leaves to shade the surface.

Make sure that your deciduous shrubs are protected. Shrubs that are planted in containers are especially susceptible to frost and must be carefully protected. With a sheet or blanket, you want to loosely cover the wigwam after you tie the tops of the canes together. This method is superior to covering plants in plastic, because air can freely circulate, which prevents rotting.

You can get most of the gardening tools you need second-hand. Visit yard sales and estate sales near you to look for gardening tools at a very low price. You can also visit online trading or donation groups to trade items you have for gardening tools, or even to find find free tools.

Test your soil before purchasing fertilizer. Fertilizers provide essential nutrients to plants, such as phosphorus, potassium and nitrogen. However, fertilizers can be very expensive. By testing your garden soil to see which nutrients it is lacking, you can avoid spending extra money on a complex fertilizer, and instead purchase a fertilizer containing only the nutrients that your soil requires.

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Pay attention to the time of year that your plants bloom before you start pruning them. If you prune your flowering shrubs and trees while they have buds on them, that plant won’t flower that year. The best time to prune is just after the last season’s blooms have faded.

Fall is the time of year to start planting those bulbs that produce the beautiful flowers that herald the beginning of spring. These types of spring flowers are easy to grow and can reward you with many years of gorgeous blooms. These bulbs need to be planted a few weeks before the first hard freeze in order to get their root system growing so they can survive the cold winter.

Grow evergreen plants. If you grow too many evergreen plants, your garden runs the risk of looking very gloomy, but a few well-placed evergreens can give a year-round framework. Choose evergreen plants with variegated or lighter green foliage, rather than sticking to darker colors. They can be used as a backdrop for spring and summer plants, and be the main attraction in the fall and winter.

So, as you can see growing an organic garden is not as complicated as it appears. It is involved in terms of research, hard work, and patience, but the personal rewards make it worth it in the end. With the above tips in mind, you should be smarter when it comes to growing your own organic garden.

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Cammie Simmons

About the Author: Cammie Simmons

Cammie Simmons encourages others to embrace the joys of gardening. She firmly believes that nurturing plants not only enhances the physical environment but also promotes mental and emotional well-being.